Finance

Spain plans tax cuts to get economy going

MADRID (AP) — The Spanish government has approved plans to cut company and income taxes in 2015 and 2016 in a bid to boost spending and investment as the country tries to recover from a double-dip recession.

Finance Minister Cristobal Montoro said Friday it was time to recompense Spaniards for the efforts made during the economic crisis. Montoro said workers would on average see their income tax bills drop by 12.5 percent by 2016.

The average corporate tax rate will be reduced to 25 percent from 30 percent over the two years. The government estimates the measures will put some 7.6 billion euros ($10.35 billion) into the economy.

The conservative government introduced widely unpopular income and value-added taxes after taking office in 2011 as part of emergency measures to reduce the swollen deficit.

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