Music

Disney Latin America's Violetta gives free concert

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — A free concert by the teen who portrays Disney's "Violetta" on Friday drew an estimated 250,000 fans in Argentina's capital, especially young girls eager to see their idol.

"Violetta" is a major hit for Disney-Latin America and fans flocked to the city's Palermo district where Martina Stoessel will sing and dance. The 17-year-old Argentine singer-actress has seen her fame skyrocket since Disney picked her for the role. She also sings the Spanish version of "Let it Go," the Oscar-winning song from the hit movie "Frozen."

She said before Friday's concert that entertaining fans in a major intersection in the city's Palermo district is her way of thanking them after a 200-show world tour. Her fans greeted her by waving flags and donning shirts and hats with her image in what seemed like a huge purple tide from above the stage located in Buenos Aires' main avenues.

Seven-year-old Mora Arias said the excitement of seeing her favorite singer in person had kept her up the night before. "I watch the series, but I like her more as a singer. I have two of her records and I have been waiting for this moment for days," said Arias, who like most other concertgoers, attended with her mother.

Leaning on a fence near the stage, Janet Rodriguez held a handwritten banner that read: 'We're not perfect, but we're Tinistas,' as Violetta fans are known. "I drew it a week ago and I can't believe the day is finally here," said the girl with bags under eyes, adding that she had arrived early to get a good spot.

__ Debora Rey on Twitter: https://twitter.com/debo_rey

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