Sci/Tech

Searchers race to find jet; no new signals heard

PERTH, Australia (AP) — With no new underwater signals detected, the search for the missing Malaysian passenger jet has resumed in a race against time to find its dying black boxes five weeks after families first learned their loved ones never arrived at their destination.

The ocean search area has been condensed, as ships and planes continued to hunt Saturday for any clue that could help find Flight 370, which disappeared en route from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing with 239 people on board, mostly Chinese.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott appeared to couch his comments from a day earlier while on a visit to China, where he met President Xi Jinping. He said Friday he was "very confident" signals heard by an Australian ship towing are coming from the Boeing 777.

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