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Iran, Russia lash out at US plans to protect oil in Syria

GENEVA (AP) — Iran and Russia on Tuesday criticized and scoffed at Trump administration plans to protect oil deposits in Syria, with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov accusing Washington of "illegal" actions.

Lavrov joined Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu in Geneva to lend support to U.N.-backed talks among Syrian government, opposition and civil society delegations on the country's constitution starting Wednesday.

The most pointed comments at their joint news conference addressed new Pentagon plans to increase efforts to protect Syria's oil fields from both the Islamic State radical group and the Russian- and Iranian-backed Syrian government, even as U.S. forces are withdrawn from other parts of the country.

"Well, it seems that the United States is staying to protect the oil — and at least President Trump is honest to say what the United States intends to do," said Zarif with a smile. Lavrov accused the United States of looking for a "pretext" to protect the oil deposits. He said any "exploitation of natural resources of a sovereign state without its consent is illegal," according to a translator of his remarks in Russian.

Cavusoglu, however, remained focused on a top priority for Turkey in Syria: Ensuring that Kurdish fighters whom the United States supported to help drive out ISIS don't threaten Turkish interests. Ankara has long argued the Kurdish fighters are an extension of the Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK, which has waged a guerrilla campaign inside Turkey since the 1980s. Turkey, U.S. and the European Union have designated the PKK as a terrorist organization.

Turkey has led a military incursion into northeastern Syria to create a 30-kilometer (19-mile) "safe zone" between Kurdish fighters and the Turkish border. Cavusoglu reiterated the hopes of Turkey — along with much of the international community — that Syria won't split apart. He suggested that areas now controlled by Turkish forces and their allies in Syria could one day be "handed over" to the Syrian government, especially if the talks enhance prospects for peace and stability.

"When times come that the Syrian regime, at the end of this political process, is capable enough to protect the country's territories and eliminate the terrorist organization (PKK) from that, I think all the territories should be handed over to Syria," he said. "This is the territory of Syria."

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