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The Latest: St. Paul archdiocese outlines deal with victims

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The Latest on the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis' bankruptcy settlement with clergy abuse victims (all times local): 2:45 p.m. The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis says it will work to expedite payments to victims of clergy sexual abuse, after a $210 million settlement was announced.

The archdiocese agreed to the settlement — the second-largest total payout in the U.S. clergy sexual abuse scandal — as part of its bankruptcy reorganization plan. The bulk of the money comes from insurance carriers, with some also coming from the archdiocese, parishes, a pension fund and some sales of real estate.

Archbishop Bernard Hebda apologized to survivors and said they can expect payments soon after the plan is approved by the court. He says he's grateful to all the victims and survivors who bravely came forward.

1:30 p.m.

The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has agreed to a $210 million settlement with victims of clergy sexual abuse as part of a plan for bankruptcy reorganization.

Victims' attorney Jeff Anderson says 450 victims of sexual abuse came forward as part of the archdiocese's bankruptcy case.

He says the settlement was reached with the survivors and the archdiocese and includes accountability measures while it also "advances the ball of child protection." The archdiocese is planning to make a statement later Thursday.

In 2013, the Minnesota Legislature opened a three-year window in the statute of limitations that allowed alleged victims of prior abuse to sue for damages. That resulted in hundreds of claims being filed against the archdiocese and led it to file for bankruptcy in 2015.

11:30 a.m.

An attorney says the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis has reached a settlement in its bankruptcy case with more than 400 sexual abuse victims.

Victims' attorney Jeff Anderson says he will hold a news conference at 1 p.m. Thursday to discuss a "consensual bankruptcy reorganization plan" between the survivors and the archdiocese. His statement didn't put a dollar figure on the settlement.

A spokesman for the archdiocese confirmed a settlement was reached. The archdiocese is also planning to hold a news conference Thursday.

In 2013, the Minnesota Legislature opened a three-year window in the statute of limitations that allowed alleged victims of prior abuse to sue for damages. That resulted in hundreds of claims being filed against the archdiocese and led it to file for bankruptcy in 2015.

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