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Lightfoot wins Chicago mayor race; pledges end to corruption

CHICAGO (AP) — Former federal prosecutor Lori Lightfoot easily won the Chicago mayor's race Tuesday, earning support from every part of the city to defeat a longtime political insider and become the first black woman and openly gay person to lead the nation's third-largest city.

Lightfoot, who had never been elected to public office, delivered a commanding victory over Toni Preckwinkle, who served in the City Council for 19 years before becoming Cook County Board president. Preckwinkle also is chairwoman of the county Democratic Party.

Lightfoot promised to rid City Hall of corruption and help low-income and working-class people she said had been "left behind and ignored" by Chicago's political ruling class. It was a message that resonated with voters weary of political scandal and insider deals, and who said the city's leaders for too long have invested in downtown at the expense of neighborhoods.

"Together we can and will make Chicago a place where your zip code doesn't determine your destiny," Lightfoot told a cheering crowd at her victory party. "We can and we will break this city's endless cycle of corruption and never again — never ever — allow politicians to profit from elected positions."

She said people are seeing "a city reborn" — a place where race and "who you love" don't matter. Chicago will become the largest U.S. city to have a black woman serve as mayor when Lightfoot is sworn in May 20. She will join seven other black women currently serving as mayors in major U.S. cities, including Atlanta and New Orleans, and will be the second woman to lead Chicago.

Preckwinkle said she called Lightfoot Tuesday night to congratulate her on a "hard-fought campaign." "While I may be disappointed I'm not disheartened. For one thing, this is clearly a historic night," she told a crowd gathered in her South Side neighborhood. "Not long ago two African American women vying for this position would have been unthinkable. And while it may be true that we took two very different paths to get here, tonight is about the path forward."

Congratulations poured in for Lightfoot, 56, who has one daughter with her wife, Amy Eshleman. Brian Johnson, CEO of Equality Illinois, said the civil rights organization for lesbian and gay people was "thrilled" with the outcome.

"This victory is historic, and it is also an undeniably proud moment for the LGBTQ community," Johnson said. Pete Buttigieg, the openly gay mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who's running for president in 2020, said on Twitter that Lightfoot "will be a terrific new leader for her city and in the community of American mayors."

Lightfoot emerged as the surprising leader in the first round of voting in February when 14 candidates were on the ballot to succeed Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who decided against running for a third term. Lightfoot seized on outrage over a white police officer's fatal shooting of black teenager Laquan McDonald to launch her reformer campaign. She got in the race even before Emanuel announced he wouldn't seek re-election amid criticism for initially resisting calls to release video of the shooting.

"I'm not a person who decided I would climb the ladder of a corrupt political party," Lightfoot said during a debate last month. "I don't hold the title of committeeman, central committeeman, boss of the party."

Preckwinkle countered that her opponent lacks the necessary experience for the job. "This is not an entry-level job," Preckwinkle said repeatedly during the campaign. Joyce Ross, 64, a resident of the city's predominantly black West Side who is a certified nursing assistant, cast her ballot Tuesday for Lightfoot. Ross said she believes Lightfoot will be better able to clean up the police department and curb the city's violence.

She was also bothered by Preckwinkle's association with longtime Alderman Ed Burke, who was indicted earlier this year on charges he tried to shake down a restaurant owner who wanted to build in his ward.

"My momma always said birds of a feather flock together," Ross said. Truly Gannon, a 39-year old mother of four who works as a dietitian, said she wasn't bothered by stories that portrayed Preckwinkle as an insider aligned with questionable politicians like Burke. She supported Preckwinkle, based on her experience.

"I'm not sure Lightfoot would be able to handle the job like Preckwinkle," she said. The campaign between the two women got off to a contentious start, with Preckwinkle's advertising focusing on Lightfoot's work as a partner at Mayer Brown, one of the nation's largest law firms, and tagging her as a "wealthy corporate lawyer."

Preckwinkle also tried to cast Lightfoot as an insider for working in police oversight posts under Emanuel and police oversight, procurement and emergency communications posts under Mayor Richard M. Daley.

But Preckwinkle had to spend much of her campaign answering for her ties to Chicago's political establishment, including Burke. Despite the barbs on the campaign trail, the two advanced similar ideas to boost the city's deeply troubled finances, which include an estimated $250 million budget deficit next year and billions in unfunded pension liabilities.

Both candidates expressed support for a casino in Chicago and changing the state's income tax system to a graduated tax, in which higher earners are taxed at a higher rate — two measures lawmakers have tried for unsuccessfully for years to pass.

Associated Press writer Don Babwin contributed to this report.

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